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9-year-old who has been battling coronavirus for 6 months says “it’s a big deal”



Eli Lipman, 9, and his father have been battling the impact of COVID-19 since March, and said life on the “long haul” isn’t easy. “Guys, I’m sorry to say, but it’s a big deal. It’s going to hurt,” Eli told CNN on Monday. “You just have to face the truth: sometimes you don’t feel well” Eli and his father, Jonathan Lipman, are part of a growing population of people who have been considered “long distance transporters,” people who have been diagnosed with the coronavirus and who have symptoms for months. Although the research found that children run a small risk of serious coronavirus disease, Eli said he felt like he was “hit a wall.”

; Eli described being sore, sore and tired. But as tired as he is and as much as he wants, he said he can’t sleep. “My body is just like ‘no’,” Eli said. Lipman said doctors initially wiped out Eli and his illnesses many times over. First in the diagnosis, then when their symptoms persisted and even when Eli’s temperature remained at a low fever for months. “Nobody would really believe that we were still sick, and when you still don’t believe it you stop believing yourself,” Lipman said. Lipman is still battling the symptoms. He said that most mornings he wakes up with pains similar to breaking his shoulder, he can’t go up the stairs without panting, and he can’t even cook dinner for his family like he loves to do because he falls asleep. William Li is researching long-haul travel patients and said that while there is still a lot to learn, the problem is likely to be with the blood vessels. “One of the important things is to keep talking to the doctor, and the doctors have to keep listening to your patients,” Li said. “There is really something unfolding before our eyes that we need in front of our eyes that we need to actually join with our patients and with ourselves as researchers and doctors to try and help heal.” He recommended them this, in addition to the normal conversation with doctors, long-distance transporters need as much sleep as possible, movement and green leafy vegetables.

Eli Lipman, 9, and his father have been battling the impact of COVID-19 since March, and said life on the “long haul” isn’t easy.

“Guys, I’m sorry to say, but it’s a big deal. It’s going to hurt,” Eli told CNN on Monday. “You just have to face the truth: sometimes you don’t feel well.”

Eli and his father, Jonathan Lipman, are part of a growing population of people who have been considered “hauliers,” people who have been diagnosed with the coronavirus and who exhibit symptoms for months. Although the research found that children run a small risk of serious coronavirus disease, Eli said he felt like he was “hit a wall.”

Eli described being sore, sore and tired. But as tired as he is and as much as he wants, he said he can’t sleep.

“My body is just like ‘no’,” Eli said.

Lipman said doctors initially wiped out Eli and his illnesses many times over. First in the diagnosis, then when the symptoms persisted and also when Eli’s temperature remained at a low fever for months.

“Nobody would really believe that we’re still sick, and when you still don’t believe it you stop believing yourself,” Lipman said.

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CNN

Eli Lipman, 9, and his father have been battling the impact of COVID-19 since March and said life as a “long hauler” isn’t easy.

Lipman is also still battling symptoms. He said that most mornings he wakes up with pains similar to breaking his shoulder, he can’t go up the stairs without panting, and he can’t even cook dinner for his family like he loves to do because he falls asleep.

Dr. William Li is researching long-haul travel patients and said that while there is still a lot to learn, the problem likely involves the blood vessels.

“One of the important things is to keep talking to the doctor, and the doctors have to keep listening to your patients,” Li said. “There is really something unfolding before our eyes that we need before our eyes that we need to actually unite our patients and with ourselves as researchers and physicians to try and help heal.”

He recommended that, in addition to regularly conversing with doctors, long-haul haulers need as much sleep as possible, exercise, and green leafy vegetables.


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