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COVID-19 highlights generations of racial health inequalities



Kevin Carter is making health a priority so he can stay strong for his community. The co-founder of the Campaign for the Poor in Sacramento is supporting COVID-19 prevention in the communities most at risk. “I’m 60 years old, I have atrial fibrillation and I’m a bit overweight, so I have to pay attention,” explained Carter. “It is important for the Black and Brown community to make sure we have health care.” Carter is among several community supporters who pushed for the test park in Oak Park, which is one of six new community test sites in Sacramento. “Everything is out in Cal Expo and people can̵

7;t get to Cal Expo and we need something in the community,” said Carter. Dr. Jann Murray-García MPH at UC Davis School of Nursing has dedicated his career to closing generations of inequalities in public health, explaining that the lack of access to health care goes back to the racial rein. “That script was written 80 or 90 years ago,” explained Murray-García. “Specifically in Sacramento there were people from colors that were pushed north and south. And so, places like South Oak Park, Meadowview and then Del Paso Heights-North Highlands – those are areas where there are a lot of Latin Americans and African Americans and high concentrations of poverty. “Those communities are greater risk of contracting the virus due to lack of access to health care and economic opportunities. “Blacks and Latin Americans tend to be basically in service areas, therefore lower wages, less flexibility, less free time for illness if they have it, “said Murray-García. “Ironically, the test wasn’t initially concentrated. This has changed in the past two weeks, but it wasn’t those neighborhoods.” The UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Inequalities explains that these gaps translate into Latin and black communities that encounter COVID-19 with the underlying health conditions. “Meat plants and the service industry, those who are considered essential workers, are the ones who are bearing the greatest weight of COVID-19 impact, direct impact,” explained Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, director of the UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Inequalities. “They have chronic diseases at high rates compared to the rest of the population, diabetes, obesity, hypertension.” That’s why supporters like Carter are being tested not only for themselves, but for their community. “We had the opportunity to raise awareness and wake people up,” said Carter. “Let them know that this is not something that is going to go away. You have to pay attention. ”

Kevin Carter is making health a priority so he can stay strong for his community.

The co-founder of the Campaign for the Poor in Sacramento is supporting COVID-19 prevention in the communities most at risk.

“I’m 60 years old, I have atrial fibrillation and I’m a bit overweight, so I have to pay attention,” explained Carter. “It is important for the Black and Brown community to make sure we have health care.”

Carter is among several community supporters who pushed for the test park in Oak Park, which is one of six new community test sites in Sacramento.

“It all ended in Cal Expo and people can’t get to Cal Expo and we need something in the community,” said Carter.

Dr. Jann Murray-García M.P.H. at UC Davis School of Nursing he dedicated his career to closing generations of inequalities in public health, explaining that the lack of access to health care goes back to racial downsizing.

“That script was written 80 or 90 years ago,” explained Murray-García. “Specifically in Sacramento there were people of color who were being pushed north and south. And so, places like South Oak Park, Meadowview and then Del Paso Heights-North Highlands – those are areas where there are a lot of Latin Americans and African Americans and high concentrations of poverty. “

These communities are more exposed to the risk of contracting the virus due to lack of access to health care and economic opportunities.

“Blacks and Latins tend to be basically in service areas – so lower wages, less flexibility, less free time for illness if they have one,” said Murray-García. “Ironically, the test wasn’t initially focused. It has changed in the past two weeks, but it wasn’t those neighborhoods.”

The UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Inequalities explains that these gaps result in Latin and black communities that encounter COVID-19 with the underlying health conditions.

“Meat plants and the service industry, those who are considered essential workers, are the ones who are bearing the greatest weight of COVID-19 impact, direct impact,” explained Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, director of the UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Inequalities. “They have chronic diseases at high rates compared to the rest of the population, diabetes, obesity, hypertension.”

That’s why supporters like Carter are being tested not only for themselves, but for their community.

“We had the opportunity to raise awareness and wake people up,” said Carter. “Let them know that this is not something that is going to go away. You have to pay attention. “


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