Home / Science / SpaceX launches another 60 Starlink satellites on Tuesday, stopping the scrub series

SpaceX launches another 60 Starlink satellites on Tuesday, stopping the scrub series



egxpl5rucaatfpr

A Falcon 9 takes off on August 30th.

SpaceX

Space fans have been hungry for action lately, with three major missions repeatedly cleaned up and postponed over the past few weeks. But early Tuesday, SpaceX finally ended the series that became known as #Scrubtober (and formerly known as #Scrubtember) with the launch and distribution of 60 new ones Starlink satellites via a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral.

This Starlink mission was the third overall flight of the Falcon 9 rocket. It sent astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken in orbit in May and then launched a South Korean satellite in the month of July. So far, SpaceX has managed to launch and land the same rocket up to six times.

The first stage of the Falcon 9 landed again on the droneship Of Course I Still Love You in the Atlantic approximately 8.5 minutes after launch on Tuesday. SpaceX also reports that it captured at least one of the fairing halves that it flew on two previous missions.

The launch, originally scheduled for September, has been postponed several times, including two last week due to heavy clouds in one case and an abnormal ground sensor reading in another. Monday’s scrub was once again attributed to time.

Another SpaceX mission to launch a US Space Force GPS satellite it was also cleaned several times, the last Friday. Meantime, United Launch Alliance tried to get one of its Delta IV Heavy rockets off the ground since August, but was delayed at least six times.

Musk expressed his clear frustration with the scrub series last week.

“We will have to make a lot of improvements to be able to complete 48 launches next year!” Musk tweeted on Friday.

Musk is certainly pleased to see Scrubtober’s spell broken. This is the thirteenth Starlink mission so far, and SpaceX is planning dozens more as its mega-constellation broadband grows.




Source link