Home / Science / Stanford researchers take the world’s first 3,200-megapixel photo

Stanford researchers take the world’s first 3,200-megapixel photo



You’ll need 378 ultra-high definition 4K screens to view this full-size photo. Imagine being able to see a golf ball from 15 miles away. Its low-light capabilities can even spot objects 100 million times fainter than we can see with the human eye.

The reason for its creation is to study dark matter and film the “greatest astronomical film of all time” and will be installed in the Stanford Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST) telescope in Chile.

The camera has 189 sensors, called charge-coupled devices (CCDs) of 16 megapixels each, and is now the largest digital camera in the world.

The interesting thing is that it contains 3.2 billion pixels, all very small. This is different from the latest version of the Sony a7S III which contains larger pixels to work in low light conditions. But it gives you high resolution, which is what they aim for here.

In 1

0 years, the camera will collect images of around 20 billion galaxies.

You can explore some of the images taken with the camera’s focal plane at full resolution. Click + and – to zoom in and out. For an explanation of the images you can read here.

See this high resolution image here.

See this high resolution image here.

You can read this topic on the Standford SLAC website.

All images are used with permission.




Source link