Home / Business / Starbucks pauses advertising on ALL social media while Pepsi joins the Facebook boycott

Starbucks pauses advertising on ALL social media while Pepsi joins the Facebook boycott



Starbucks has suspended all of its advertising on social media platforms as Pepsi becomes the latest brand to join the Facebook boycott, while more entities in corporate America express their support for a crackdown on online hate speech.

Seattle-based coffee chain Starbucks Corp will pause advertising on all social media platforms as it explores the best ways to help stop the spread of hate speech, the company said in a statement on Sunday.

The company “will discuss internally and with media partners and civil rights organizations to stop the spread of the hate speech,” the statement said.

A CNBC report on Sunday added that this break on Starbucks social media will not include YouTube, which is owned by Google of Alphabet Inc.

Seattle-based coffee chain Starbucks said that

Seattle-based coffee chain Starbucks said it will “pause” advertising on social media platforms. A Starbucks location is seen above in the Union Square section of New York City on June 24

Starbucks released a statement on its website on Sunday announcing that it was pausing advertising on social media platforms

Starbucks released a statement on its website on Sunday announcing that it was pausing advertising on social media platforms

Will continue to post on social media without paid promotion.

He also said that although Starbucks is pausing the advertisement, it is not joining the “Stop Hate For Profit” boycott campaign, which began earlier this month.

Meanwhile, the beverage maker Pepsi is reportedly running ads from Facebook.

Advertising will stop between July and August, Fox Business News reported on Sunday.

Sources describe the move as a “global boycott” on Facebook’s ad placement, according to the report.

PepsiCo did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Reuters.

Reportedly, Pepsi has joined a growing list of companies that have withdrawn advertisements from Facebook

Reportedly, Pepsi has joined a growing list of companies that have withdrawn advertisements from Facebook

More than 160 companies, including Verizon Communications and Unilever Plc, have signed up to stop buying advertisements on Facebook Inc, the world’s largest social media platform.

Facebook has come under severe pressure from advertisers to crack down on hate speech that spreads across its platform.

After several large companies announced last week that they were withdrawing advertisements from Facebook, the tech giant’s actions plummeted to Wall Street.

The platform’s shares plunged 8.3 percent to $ 216.08 from Friday’s closing bell, the lowest in three months.

Friday’s sharp drop represents a staggering $ 56 billion loss in the company’s value.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promised hate speech after his company put a warning label on a video from the Republican National Committee (RNC).

But it doesn’t seem to satisfy critics who claim that Facebook has benefited handsomely by allowing unrestricted speech on its site.

The company’s drop in shares on Friday dealt a heavy blow of $ 7.2 billion to Zuckerberg’s personal fortune, pushing him from third to fourth in the Bloomberg Billionaires index and leaving him with a new net worth of $ 82.3 billion.

The social network has come under intense pressure to curb untroubled hate speech on its website

The social network has come under intense pressure to curb uncontrolled hate speech on its website

Facebook shares plunged 8.3 percent to $ 216.08 from the closing bell on Friday, the lowest in three months

Facebook shares plunged 8.3 percent to $ 216.08 from the closing bell on Friday, the lowest in three months

This came after Coca-Cola and Unilever became the last major companies to pull the plug from Facebook advertising on Friday, joining several companies including Dove, Honda and Ben & Jerry’s in a support show for the #StopHateForProfit campaign.

Coca-Cola announced a pause on all paid social media advertising around the world for at least 30 days saying “there is no place for racism in the world and there is no place for racism on social media” while Unilever, one of the world’s largest advertisers, said he would stop spending money on Facebook for the rest of the year.

Zuckerberg traded under pressure on Friday and announced new content policies for the platform, including tighter advertising restrictions and labels for “malicious” posts from public figures.

The GOP appears to be one of the first to address the crackdown on “harmful” and “hateful” content, after Facebook put a warning label on a video released by the RNC on “left anarchists” on Friday.

The platform issued a warning about “violent or graphic content” in the video titled “It’s Destroying America,” which features footage of police cars on fire along with snippets of speeches made by Black Lives co-founder Matter Patrisse. Cullors and the Democrats Nancy Pelosi, Joe Biden and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

“This video may show violent or graphic content,” reads the Facebook notice. “We covered this video so you can decide if you want to see it.”

The video opens with footage of Cullors saying “we are trained Marxists” before continuing to show fragments of violent scenes across America amidst the civil unrest going on following the murder of Black Man’s Memorial Day George Floyd by a white policeman in Minneapolis.

Facebook put a warning label in a video posted by the Republican National Committee on

Facebook put a warning label in a video posted by the Republican National Committee on “left anarchists” after CEO Mark Zuckerberg gave in and said the social media giant would ban hate speech on the platform following a boycott of 100 advertisers

“The” trained Marxists “are violently unleashed”, flashes on the screen while the video shows selected scenes of a policeman hit by a car, a Los Angeles police cruiser on fire, an inverted statue of Ulysses Grant and St. John Church in flames during protests calling for an end to police brutality and racism.

It also contains unedited and edited footage of democratic rivals.

Spokesman Pelosi is heard saying “I don’t even know why there are no riots across the country and maybe there will be” while Presidential candidate Biden says “we have an incredible opportunity to radically transform the country”.

“Make sure the police departments are dismissed,” says Ocasio-Cortez in a clip followed by representative Ilhan Omar who makes a call to “completely dismantle” the Minneapolis police department.

The footage, which ends by telling viewers of “Vote for Trump”, says that so-called “anarchists” are attacking police officers, “snatching communities” and “destroying America”.

The warning came when the social media giant was targeted for not removing or labeling hate speeches, such as Donald Trump’s posts and misinformation about Black Lives Matter’s protests.

More than 100 companies have so far joined the Facebook boycott with Coca-Cola which announced Friday that it would join the likes of Dove, Unilever and Verizon.

“The Coca-Cola Company will pause paid advertising on all social media platforms globally for at least 30 days,” said Coca-Cola CEO and president James Quincey in a statement, adding that the company is not joining the official boycott.

‘It will take some time to reassess our advertising policies to determine if reviews are needed. We also expect more accountability and transparency from our social media partners. “

On Friday, Zuckerberg said in a live Facebook video that the company will start labeling

On Friday, Zuckerberg said in a live Facebook video that the company will start labeling “harmful” content from politicians who remain “noteworthy”.

Zuckerberg responded to the boycott in a Facebook live video on Friday, in which he announced that the company would start labeling “harmful” content by politicians who remain “noteworthy”.

Although he did not name Trump, the policy comes in response to a campaign requiring Facebook to impose stricter restrictions on “disinformation” in the president’s campaign announcements and his inflammatory posts.

Twitter has already slapped warning labels on some of the president’s tweets that he deemed offensive or threatening, and unlike Facebook, Twitter has banned all political campaign announcements.

Zuckerberg made the move when Twitter first tagged a Trump tweet, saying it wasn’t up to social media companies to be the “arbiters of truth” – but the Facebook CEO seems to have changed his mind following the punished boycott of the advertisers.

“We will soon start labeling some of the content that we leave because it is deemed noteworthy, so that people can know when it is,” said Zuckerberg in live streaming.

“We will allow people to share this content to condemn it, just as we do with other problematic content, because this is an important part of the way we discuss what’s acceptable in our society – but we will add a prompt to tell people that the content that they are sharing may violate our policies, “he continued.

Coca-Cola announced a pause on all paid social media advertising around the world for at least 30 days saying

Coca-Cola announced a pause on all paid social media advertising globally for at least 30 days saying “there is no place for racism in the world and there is no place for racism on social media”

North Face promised loyalty to civil rights groups last week

Now several major companies including ice cream maker Ben & Jerry's have joined the boycott

North Face promised loyalty to civil rights groups for the first time last week and now several major companies including ice cream maker Ben & Jerry’s have joined the boycott.

Zuckerberg also announced new repressive policies on hateful advertising, as well as guidelines on voting information.

Companies that have joined the boycott of Facebook ads

  • Unilever
  • Verizon
  • Eddie Bauer
  • Eileen Fisher
  • Ben & Jerry’s
  • Patagonia
  • north side
  • REI
  • oDesk
  • Rakuten Viber
  • Magnolia Pictures
  • Goodbye Silverstein
  • dove
  • Coke
  • Dockers
  • Levi
  • Honda
  • PepsiCo
  • The Hershey Company
  • Lululemon
  • JanSport
  • Birchbox
  • Mozilla

“We have already limited certain types of content in the ads allowed in regular posts, but we want to do more to ban the kind of divisive and inflammatory language that has been used to sow discord,” said Zuckerberg.

‘So today we ban a wider category of hateful content in advertisements. In particular, we are expanding our advertising policy to ban claims that people of a specific race, ethnicity, national origin, religious background, caste, sexual orientation, gender identity or immigration status pose a threat to physical security, health or survival of others, ‘he said.

“We are also expanding our policies to better protect immigrants, migrants, refugees and asylum seekers from advertisements suggesting that these groups are inferior or expressing contempt, dismissal or disgust with them,” he continued.

A boycott of advertisers followed that grew rapidly over the past week, organized by activists asking Facebook to impose more restrictions on hate speech and disinformation. Honda and Unilver were the last major companies to join the boycott.

However, Zuckerberg did not directly address the boycott in his address. At least some of the boycott organizers said Zuckerberg’s new policies were inadequate.

“Zuckerberg’s address was 11 minutes of wasted opportunities to commit to change,” tweeted Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change, organizer of the “Stop Hate For Profit” boycott campaign.

“I hope the companies that advertise on Facebook were watching: if they want to put their money in the mouth of racial justice, then it’s time to #StopHateForProfit,” added Robinson.

“Mark Zuckerberg responded today with small changes that do not adequately address #hate and disinformation,” tweeted Johnathan Greenblatt, president of the Anti-Defamation League, a key supporter of the boycott.

Greenblatt said that if Facebook were “serious”, they would put in place the detailed list of activist requests.

On Friday, Unilever said it would stop advertising on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in the United States for the rest of the year, citing “divisions and hate speech during this period of polarized elections in the United States”.

The consumer goods company, which owns brands like Dove Soap and Lipton tea, joins a growing advertising boycott against Facebook as part of the “Stop Hate for Profit” campaign launched by US activists after the death of George Floyd.

The effort called on Instagram owner Facebook to do more to stop hate speech and criticized the company for not doing more to limit President Donald Trump’s posts and advertising campaigns.

Unilever affiliate Ben & Jerry’s, which has an independent board, had previously announced that it would join the boycott on Facebook earlier this week, likely putting pressure on the London-based parent company, which has an annual global advertising budget of almost $ 8 billion.

On Friday, Unilever said it will stop advertising on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in the United States for 2020

On Friday, Unilever said it will stop advertising on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in the United States for 2020

‘Continuing to advertise on these platforms right now would not add value to people and society. We will constantly monitor and review our current position if necessary, “Unilever said in a statement.

The company, based in the Netherlands and Great Britain, joins a number of other companies that block advertising on online platforms.

Facebook in particular has been the target of a growing movement to steal advertising dollars in an attempt to push the social media giant to do more to prevent racist and violent content from being shared on its platform.

“We have decided that starting at least until the end of the year, we will not advertise the brand on the newsfeed platforms of social media Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in the United States,” said Unilever.

On Thursday, Verizon joined others in the Facebook boycott.

Sarah Personette, vice president of global customer solutions on Twitter, said that the company’s mission is to serve public conversation and ensure that Twitter is a place where people can make human connections, search for and receive authentic information and credible, and express yourself freely and safely. ‘

He added that Twitter is “respectful of our partners’ decisions and will continue to work and communicate closely with them during this period.”

The #StopHateForProfit campaign comes as Facebook faces increasing pressure on its practical approach to disinformation and post-inflammatory, including from Trump.

The social media company was making around $ 70 billion a year from advertisements, according to the coalition in a statement on the ADL website.

The campaign criticized Zuckerberg’s decision not to moderate the president after the CEO again defended his decision not to limit Trump’s often controversial, incendiary and inaccurate posts.

Twitter’s May decision to hide one of Trump’s tweets for “glorifying violence” highlighted Facebook’s agitation, with employees rebelling against Zuckerberg’s refusal to sanction false or inflammatory posts by the president .

Facebook last week said it had removed advertisements from Trump’s reelection campaign which contained a symbol used in Nazi Germany for political prisoners, a move welcomed by rights activists.

Activists called on Facebook to crack down on Trump and his campaign harder as the November election looms.

“It is clear that Facebook and its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, are no longer simply negligent, but in fact complacent in the spread of disinformation, despite irreversible damage to our democracy,” NAACP said in a tweet.

The coalition criticized Zuckerberg’s decision late last month to leave a particularly inflammatory Trump place, which he said in part: “When the looting begins, filming begins.” Twitter hid the same message behind a warning that said the post “incited violence”.

Several Facebook employees staged a “virtual strike” on Zuckerberg’s decision.

The Facebook co-founder then held a conference call with the civil rights leaders who sentenced him for not removing the post.

In a subsequent statement, Rashad Robinson of Color of Change, Vanita Gupta of the Leadership Conference and Sherrilyn Ifill of LDF said: “He [Zuckerberg] it has not shown understanding of the historical or modern repression of voters and refuses to recognize how Facebook is facilitating Trump’s request for violence against protesters. Mark is setting a very dangerous precedent for other rumors that would say similar harmful things on Facebook. ‘

Complete statement by Mark Zuckerberg on new Facebook policies

Three weeks ago, I pledged to review our policies before the 2020 elections. That work is in progress, but today I want to share some new policies to connect people with authoritative information about the vote, repress voter repression and fight. hate speech.

The 2020 elections were already preparing to be heated – and this was before we all faced the further complexities of voting during a pandemic and protests for racial justice across the country. During this time, Facebook will take additional precautions to help everyone stay safe, stay informed and ultimately use their voice where it matters most: vote.

Many of the changes we announce today come directly from feedback from the civil rights community and reflect months of work with our civil rights reviewers, led by well-known civil rights and freedoms experts Laura W. Murphy and Megan Cacace, a respected study partner civil rights lawyer of Relman & Colfax. Facebook is synonymous with giving voice to people, especially people who previously hadn’t had the same voice or power to share their experiences.

1. Provide authoritative information on voting during the pandemic

Last week, we announced the largest voting information campaign in American history, with the goal of helping 4 million people register to vote. As part of this, we are creating a Voting Information Center to share authoritative information on how and when you can vote, including voter registration, postal voting and early voting. During a pandemic in which people may be afraid to go to the polls, it will be particularly important to share authoritative information about the vote by mail. In the coming months we will show the Voting Information Center at the top of the Facebook and Instagram apps.

In the middle of Covid, we also focus on preventing new forms of potential suppression of voters. For example, if someone says on election day that a city has been identified as a Covid hotspot, is it suppressing voters or simply sharing health information? Due to the difficulty of judging this on a large scale, we are adopting a link linking policy to our Voting Information Center for posts that discuss voting, including by politicians. This is not a judgment that the posts themselves are accurate, but we want people to have access to authoritative information in both ways.

2. Additional steps to combat suppression of voters

In 2018, we updated our policies to ban any content that misleads people as to when or how they can vote. We are strengthening these policies to reflect the reality of the 2020 elections.

Since the most dangerous voter suppression campaigns can be local and run in the days immediately preceding the election, we will use our Electoral Operations Center to respond quickly and remove false statements about voting conditions in the 72 hours preceding election day. By learning from our experience in the fight against Covid’s disinformation, we will collaborate and rely on state electoral authorities to help determine the accuracy of information and what is potentially dangerous. We know this will be challenging in practice as the facts on the ground may be uncertain and we do not want to remove accurate information about the challenges people are facing, but we are building our operations to be able to respond quickly.

We will also ban posts that make false claims saying that ICE agents check immigration papers in polling stations, which is a tactic used to discourage voting. We will also remove any threat of coordinated interference, such as someone who says “My friends and I will monitor our polls to make sure only the right people vote,” which can be used to intimidate voters. We will continue to review our voter suppression policies on an ongoing basis as part of our work on voter engagement and racial justice.

3. Creating a higher standard for obnoxious content in ads

This week’s EU study showed that Facebook acts faster and removes a greater percentage of hate speech on our services than other major Internet platforms, including YouTube and Twitter. We have invested heavily in both artificial intelligence systems and human review teams so that we now identify almost 90% of the hate speech we remove before someone informs us. We also set the standard in our industry by publishing periodic transparency reports so that people can hold us accountable for progress. We will continue to invest in this work and will commit all necessary resources to improve our application.

We believe there is a public interest in allowing a wider range of free expressions in people’s posts than paid ads. We already limit some types of content in the ads we allow in regular posts, but we want to do more to prohibit the kind of divisive and inflammatory language that has been used to sow discord. So today we ban a wider category of hateful content in advertisements. In particular, we are expanding our advertising policy to ban claims that people of a specific race, ethnicity, national origin, religious background, caste, sexual orientation, gender identity or immigration status pose a threat to physical security, health or survival of others. We are also expanding our policies to better protect immigrants, migrants, refugees and asylum seekers from advertisements suggesting that these groups are inferior or expressing contempt, dismissal or disgust with them.

4. Label interesting content

A handful of times a year, we leave content that would otherwise violate our policies if the value of the public interest outweighs the risk of harm. Often, seeing the speeches of politicians is in the public interest and in the same way that the news reports what a politician says, we think people should generally be able to see them alone on our platforms.

We will soon start labeling some of the content we leave because it is deemed noteworthy, so that people can know when it is. We will allow people to share this content to condemn it, just as we do with other problematic content, because this is an important part of how we discuss what is acceptable in our society – but we will add a prompt to tell people that the content that they are sharing may violate our policies.

To clarify a point: there is no journalistic exemption in the content that incites violence or represses the vote. Even if a politician or government official says so, if we determine that content can lead to violence or deprive people of their right to vote, we will delete that content. Likewise, there are no exceptions for politicians in any of the policies that I will announce here today.

Overall, the policies we are implementing today are designed to address the reality of the challenges that our country is facing and how they are manifesting across our community. I am committed to making Facebook remain a place where people can use their voices to discuss important issues, because I believe we can make more progress when we talk to each other. But I am also against hatred or anything that incites violence or represses the vote and we are committed to removing it, regardless of where it comes from.

We are continuing to review our policies and will continue to work with external experts and civil rights organizations to adapt our approach as new risks emerge. I am optimistic that we can make progress on public health and racial justice by maintaining our democratic traditions on free expression and voting. I am committed to making Facebook a force for good on this journey.


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