Home / US / ‘Where are all the arrests?’: Trump asks Barr to lock up his enemies

‘Where are all the arrests?’: Trump asks Barr to lock up his enemies



In the early afternoon, Trump was unleashing his frustrations in a capital letter that seemed to be aimed at no one in particular.

“DO SOMETHING OF THIS, THE GREATEST OF ALL POLITICAL SCANDALS (IN HISTORY) !!! BIDEN, OBAMA AND CROOKED HILLARY LED THIS TREASURE PLOT !!! OFFERS MUST NOT BE ALLOWED TO RUN – THEY ARE TAKEN !!! “Trump tweeted.

The long string of tweets and retweets marked the busiest stretch of Trump’s public activity since he left the presidential suite at Walter Reed Medical Center and returned to treatment at the White House. They also stressed the degree to which Trump remains fixated on his grievances over the Russia investigation, and often on obscure aspects of that investigation that are incomprehensible to all but his most alert followers.

Since late Tuesday, Trump has promised to declassify any documents he claims will show improper activity by Obama and his intelligence advisers ̵

1; before quickly going back and suggesting he did so “a long time ago” – and has repeatedly cited claims by Russian intelligence services that Clinton “stirred up” the Trump-Russia collusion scandal that haunted his presidency.

The Trump administration has never held a firm stance that the president’s tweets constitute direct orders; various revealing books have described how senior officials learned which of his instructions, legal or otherwise, to ignore and which to accept. Courts have sometimes treated Trump’s tweets in official statements. But on other occasions they have been dismissed as political jokes without the force of law.

Trump’s Twitter feed tends to be a real-time barometer of his offline moods and whims, however, and the themes he repeatedly hits over 280 characters on tend to surface in the conversations he holds in private.

A Department of Justice spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment on whether Trump had ever directly asked Barr to order the arrest of his rivals or whether his tweet suggesting that he had just as much veered into territory that Barr once did. he said he made his job “impossible”.

In past interviews, Barr has signaled that he has no plans to prosecute senior Obama administration officials, although he has questioned the motives behind the investigation into Russia and has launched an investigation into its origins.

The Barr-ordered review has disappointed Trump in recent weeks as US lawyer John Durham has signaled that he may not pursue the kind of high-profile prosecutions that the president and his allies are demanding. Durham’s deputy in the review, Nora Dennehy, a veteran attorney at the Department of Justice, recently dropped the faltering effort and returned to the private sector.

“NOW THAT THE DEMOCRATS OF THE RADICAL LEFT HAVE COUGH [sic] COLD IN THE (UN) FRIENDLY TRANSFER OF THE GOVERNMENT, IN FACT, THEY SPY ON MY CAMPAIGN AND WENT FOR A COUPLE, WE HAVE THE RIGHT TO ASK VOTERS FOR ANOTHER FOUR YEARS, “Trump said late Wednesday morning.” REMEMBER THIS WHEN YOU VOTE! “

Trump’s flurry of tweets was particularly shocking when compared to the political context. Biden has widened his lead over Trump in recent polls, as the president’s support has eroded among women, seniors, and other electoral blocs helping him get a victory in 2016. Trump baffled his allies on Tuesday by summarily closing – including via Twitter – Negotiations on coronavirus stimulus bill, only to go back hours later asking Congress to pass more targeted measures.

But Trump has made it clear that he remains focused on punishing perceived enemies regardless of the political cost. On Monday morning, as he was recovering from Walter Reed, his chief of staff Mark Meadows told Fox News that Trump had been busy that morning in part by directing the declassification of documents relating to the Russia investigation – a series of files that he claimed they were conclusive evidence that Clinton had invented the idea that his campaign team had ties to Russia even though the Senate Intelligence Committee and Special Adviser team had rejected the allegations as unverified.

In releasing them, Trump’s chosen intelligence chief, John Ratcliffe, acknowledged the documents, provided to Russian intelligence, may have been “exaggerated” or even “fabricated” to deviate from their guilt in the election interference effort.


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